Conference Presentations

Below is an annotated list of my conference presentations and invited talks.

Conference Presentations:

“Capable of Shame?  HRO Shaming, State Capabilites, and Government Respect for Physical Integrity” (with Chad Clay), Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association 2017, Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (2017). This paper evaluates when naming and shaming by Human Rights NGOs is most effective. We find that states which are most vulnerable to domestic and international audience costs that have the capacity to improve are most likely to increase respect in the wake of naming and shaming campaigns.

“Repudiation and Repression: The Human Costs of Sovereign Default” (with Chad Clay and Matt Digiuseppe) Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association (2017), Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association (2017)- This paper examines under what conditions sovereign default is most likely to reduce respect for physical integrity rights.

“The Impact of International and Colonial Institutions on Overall Development”  Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (2016), Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association (2016) This dissertation chapter evaluates the conditional effects of IMF Structural Adjustment Programs as well as World Bank conditional aid programs on a Bayesian latent variable that is measured across four dimensions of development: health, environmental sustainability, economic growth and stability, and human capital.

“The Democratic Advantage: Distinguishing Debt Type Makes a Difference” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association (2016) and at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association (2016) This paper suggests that sovereign default is a choice, and that fear of accountability may be the reason that sovereigns choose to default on foreign owned debt at higher rates than domestic debt.

“Self-Binding Autocrats: A Strategic Explanation for the Emergence of Economic Judicial Independence”, Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association (2016) This paper provides a theoretical explanation for why autocrats allow judiciaries to rule without interference for cases in the economic realm. We test this theory with empirical data and find that autocrats self-bind in situations where they must co-opt rival elites at higher rates.

“Towards a New Conceptualization of the Welfare State” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association (2016) This paper introduces a Bayesian latent variable measure of decommodification, reducing measurement error and allowing for more valid cross national comparisons, as well as providing a framework for using the measure as both a dependent and independent variable.

“Extra Dyadic Trade and Conflict Type” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association (2015), with John Willingham- Paper introduces a new operationalization of conflict, which captures lower levels of belligerent state behavior. We then use the new data to replicate Kleinberg, Robinson, and French 2015.

“Worker Rights, Development, and Global Capital” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Studies Association, New Orleans, LA (2015)- Paper uses sovereign credit ratings as a proxy for development, and then provides evidence that respect for worker rights in practice leads to higher future credit ratings/better development.

“Best for Business: Worker Rights, Development, and Global Capital” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA (2015) This paper evaluates the impact respecting worker rights has on overall economic development, using sovereign credit ratings as a proxy for economic growth and stability.

“Analyzing Authoritarian Default” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA (2015) with Allison Cuttner- Paper explores sovereign default likelihood within an autocratic context, focusing on several institutional leadership constraints.

“A Renewed Look at the Democratic Advantage: Regime Type and Default” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association (2014)- Paper provides evidence that sovereigns treat domestically owned debt and foreign owned debt differently, and attempts to refocus the democratic advantage literature on the initial mechanisms provided by North and Weingast.

“A New Look at the Democratic Advantage: Regime Type and Default” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA (2014)

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